Julie Parsonnet

Publication Details

  • Gastric atrophy and extent of intestinal metaplasia in a cohort of Helicobacter pylori-infected patients HUMAN PATHOLOGY Guarner, J., Herrera-Goepfert, R., Mohar, A., Sanchez, L., Halperin, D., Ley, C., Parsonnet, J. 2001; 32 (1): 31-35

    Abstract:

    Atrophy and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are preneoplastic gastric lesions associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Atrophy and IM are usually found together; however, the association between increasing degrees of severity of both atrophy and IM has not been evaluated completely. Two pathologists graded atrophy and IM using the visual analog scale of the Sydney classification in gastric biopsies from 368 H pylori-infected patients. Extent of IM also included determining the number of specimens affected. We then correlated the degree of atrophy with the degree and number of specimens affected with IM by calculating relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The mean number of biopsies examined from each patient was 6.5. Atrophy and IM were found more frequently in the antrum (85% and 75% of biopsies, respectively). One hundred thirty-eight patients had a combination of atrophy and IM, 48 had IM only, and 89 had atrophy only. Fifty-three subjects had mild atrophy and IM (RR = 1.57; 95% CI 1.2-2.1), 69 had moderate atrophy and IM (RR = 1.86; 95% CI 1.9-2.4), and 16 had marked atrophy and IM (RR = 2.47; 95% CI 1.8-3.3). The median number of biopsy specimens with IM increased from 0 in subjects with no atrophy to 3 in subjects with severe atrophy. The degree of IM correlated with the degree of atrophy; the median degree was 0.6 in subjects with no atrophy and increased to 2.32 in those with severe atrophy. Our data suggest that higher degrees of IM in an individual specimen and increasing number of specimens with IM are associated with moderate or severe degrees of atrophy.

    View details for DOI 10.1053/hupa.2001.20889

    View details for Web of Science ID 000166729700006

    View details for PubMedID 11172292

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: