John Ratliff

Publication Details

  • Impact of a Standardized Protocol and Antibiotic-Impregnated Catheters on Ventriculostomy Infection Rates in Cerebrovascular Patients NEUROSURGERY Harrop, J. S., Sharan, A. D., Ratliff, J., Prasad, S., Jabbour, P., Evans, J. J., Veznedaroglu, E., Andrews, D. W., Maltenfort, M., Liebman, K., Flomenberg, P., Sell, B., Baranoski, A. S., Fonshell, C., Reiter, D., Rosenwasser, R. H. 2010; 67 (1): 187-191

    Abstract:

    Ventriculostomy infections create significant morbidity. To reduce infection rates, a standardized evidence-based catheter insertion protocol was implemented. A prospective observational study analyzed the effects of this protocol alone and with antibiotic-impregnated ventriculostomy catheters.To compare infection rates after implementing a standardized protocol for ventriculostomy catheter insertion with and without the use of antibiotic-impregnated catheters.Between 2003 and 2008, 1961 ventriculostomies and infections were documented. A ventriculostomy infection was defined as 2 positive CSF cultures from ventriculostomy catheters with a concurrent increase in cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count. A baseline (preprotocol) infection rate was established (period 1). Infection rates were monitored after adoption of the standardized protocol (period 2), institution of antibiotic-impregnated catheter A (period 3), discontinuation of antibiotic-impregnated catheter A (period 4), and institution of antibiotic-impregnated catheter B (period 5).The baseline infection rate (period 1) was 6.7% (22/327 devices). Standardized protocol (period 2) implementation did not change the infection rate (8.2%; 23/281 devices). Introduction of catheter A (period 3) reduced infections to 1.0% (2/195 devices, P=.0005). Because of technical difficulties, this catheter was discontinued (period 4), resulting in an increase in infection rate (7.6%; 12/157 devices). Catheter B (period 5) significantly decreased infections to 0.9% (9 of 1001 devices, P=.0001). The Staphylococcus infection rate for periods 1, 2, and 4 was 6.1% (47/765) compared with 0.2% (1/577) during use of antibiotic-impregnated catheters (periods 3 and 5).The use of antibiotic-impregnated catheters resulted in a significant reduction of ventriculostomy infections and is recommended in the adult neurosurgical population.

    View details for DOI 10.1227/01.NEU.0000370247.11479.B6

    View details for Web of Science ID 000278875400048

    View details for PubMedID 20559105

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