William Fearon, MD

Publication Details

  • Fractional Flow Reserve Versus Angiography for Guiding Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease 2-Year Follow-Up of the FAME (Fractional Flow Reserve Versus Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation) Study JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY Pijls, N. H., Fearon, W. F., Tonino, P. A., Siebert, U., Ikeno, F., Bornschein, B., van't Veer, M., Klauss, V., Manoharan, G., Engstrom, T., Oldroyd, K. G., Lee, P. N., MacCarthy, P. A., De Bruyne, B. 2010; 56 (3): 177-184

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the 2-year outcome of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) guided by fractional flow reserve (FFR) in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD).In patients with multivessel CAD undergoing PCI, coronary angiography is the standard method for guiding stent placement. The FAME (Fractional Flow Reserve Versus Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation) study showed that routine FFR in addition to angiography improves outcomes of PCI at 1 year. It is unknown if these favorable results are maintained at 2 years of follow-up.At 20 U.S. and European medical centers, 1,005 patients with multivessel CAD were randomly assigned to PCI with drug-eluting stents guided by angiography alone or guided by FFR measurements. Before randomization, lesions requiring PCI were identified based on their angiographic appearance. Patients randomized to angiography-guided PCI underwent stenting of all indicated lesions, whereas those randomized to FFR-guided PCI underwent stenting of indicated lesions only if the FFR was 0.80, the rate of myocardial infarction was 0.2% and the rate of revascularization was 3.2 % after 2 years.Routine measurement of FFR in patients with multivessel CAD undergoing PCI with drug-eluting stents significantly reduces mortality and myocardial infarction at 2 years when compared with standard angiography-guided PCI. (Fractional Flow Reserve Versus Angiography for Multivessel Evaluation [FAME]; NCT00267774).

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2010.04.012

    View details for Web of Science ID 000279520200002

    View details for PubMedID 20537493

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