Michael Longaker

Publication Details

  • The SNaP System: Biomechanical and Animal Model Testing of a Novel Ultraportable Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy System PLASTIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Fong, K. D., Hu, D., Eichstadt, S., Gupta, D. M., Pinto, M., Gurtner, G. C., Longaker, M. T., Lorenz, H. P. 2010; 125 (5): 1362-1371

    Abstract:

    Negative-pressure wound therapy is traditionally achieved by attaching an electrically powered pump to a sealed wound bed and applying subatmospheric pressure by means of gauze or foam. The Smart Negative Pressure (SNaP) System (Spiracur, Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif.) is a novel ultraportable negative-pressure wound therapy system that does not require an electrically powered pump.Negative pressure produced by the SNaP System, and a powered pump, the wound vacuum-assisted closure advanced-therapy system (Kinetic Concepts, Inc., San Antonio, Texas), were compared in vitro using bench-top pressure sensor testing and microstrain and stress testing with pressure-sensitive film and micro-computed tomographic scan analysis. In addition, to test in vivo efficacy, 10 rats underwent miniaturized SNaP (mSNaP) device placement on open wounds. Subject rats were randomized to a system activation group (approximately -125 mmHg) or a control group (atmospheric pressure). Wound measurements and histologic data were collected for analysis.Bench measurement revealed nearly identical negative-pressure delivery and mechanical strain deformation patterns between both systems. Wounds treated with the mSNaP System healed faster, with decreased wound size by postoperative day 7 (51 percent versus 12 percent reduction; p < 0.05) and had more rapid complete reepithelialization (21 days versus 32 days; p < 0.05). The mSNaP device also induced robust granulation tissue formation.The SNaP System and an existing electrically powered negative-pressure wound therapy system have similar biomechanical properties and functional wound-healing benefits. The potential clinical efficacy of the SNaP device for the treatment of wounds is supported.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181d62b25

    View details for Web of Science ID 000276886600008

    View details for PubMedID 20440156

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