Hannah Valantine

Publication Details

  • FREQUENCY AND MECHANISM OF BRADYCARDIA IN CARDIAC TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS AND NEED FOR PACEMAKERS AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY Dibiase, A., Tse, T. M., Schnittger, I., Wexler, L., Stinson, E. B., Valantine, H. A. 1991; 67 (16): 1385-1389

    Abstract:

    Orthotopic cardiac transplantation is occasionally complicated by unexplained bradyarrhythmias. Sinus node injury as a consequence of operation or acute rejection has anecdotally been linked to the development of bradycardia early after transplantation. These arrhythmias are empirically managed by pacemaker implantation, the indications for which remain poorly defined. This retrospective study examined the 20-year experience of our institution with bradyarrhythmias after transplantation to determine the predisposing factors and indications for pacemaker implantation. Forty-one of 556 patients in our cardiac transplant program (7.4%) received permanent pacemakers between 1969 and 1989. The predominant rhythm disturbances were junctional rhythm (46%), sinus arrest (27%) and sinus bradycardia (17%). Most patients were asymptomatic (61%), and presented in the early post-transplant period (73%). Four possible predisposing factors were evaluated: (1) graft ischemic time, (2) rejection history, (3) use of bradycardia-inducing drugs, and (4) anatomy of blood supply to the sinoatrial (SA) node. No significant differences existed between patients with and without pacemakers with regard to the first 3 variables. However, after transplantation angiograms showed that prevalence of abnormal SA nodal arteries was greater in patients with than without pacemakers (p less than 0.02). Pacemaker follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months showed persistent bradycardia (60 to 90 beats/min) in 88, 75 and 50% of patients, respectively. The most common pacemaker complication (15%) was lead displacement at time of biopsy. These results suggest that disruption of the SA nodal blood supply may be an important predisposing factor in the development of bradycardias.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991FR02000014

    View details for PubMedID 2042569

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: