Craig T. Albanese, MD, MBA

Publication Details

  • Congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the liver: Does the lung-to-head ratio predict survival? JOURNAL OF ULTRASOUND IN MEDICINE Sbragia, L., Paek, B. W., Filly, R. A., Harrison, M. R., Farrell, J. A., Farmer, D. L., Albanese, C. T. 2000; 19 (12): 845-848

    Abstract:

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the ability of lung-to-head ratio to predict survival and need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in fetuses with left congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the liver into the chest. The perinatal records of 20 fetuses with isolated left congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of the left lobe of the liver into the chest were reviewed. Fetuses were stratified into two groups depending on lung-to-head ratio: those with a ratio of less than 1.4 (historically a poor prognosis group) and those with a ratio of greater than 1.4. The outcome of both groups was compared with chi-square analysis. Eight of 11 fetuses with a lung-to-head ratio greater than 1.4 survived, whereas 8 of 9 fetuses with a ratio of less than 1.4 survived. No differences were noted in the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support or survival between the two groups. Fetuses with a prenatally diagnosed left congenital diaphragmatic hernia without herniation of liver into the chest have a favorable prognosis even in the presence of a low lung-to-head ratio.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000167755000006

    View details for PubMedID 11127009

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