Jonathan S. Berek

Publication Details

  • SERUM INTERLEUKIN-6 LEVELS CORRELATE WITH DISEASE STATUS IN PATIENTS WITH EPITHELIAL OVARIAN-CANCER Berek, J. S., Chung, C., Kaldi, K., Watson, J. M., Knox, R. M., MARTINEZMAZA, O. MOSBY-ELSEVIER. 1991: 1038-1043

    Abstract:

    Interleukin-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine with a wide range of effects, including induction of B-cell and cytotoxic T-cell differentiation, and induction of acute phase reactant production by hepatocytes. Interleukin-6 also can act as an autocrine growth factor in malignancy. Various cell types produce interleukin-6, including T and B cells, monocytes, fibroblasts, and some solid tumor cells. In previous work we detected the production of substantial amounts of interleukin-6 by human ovarian cancer cells, including the ovarian cancer cell lines CAOV-3, OVCAR-3, and SKOV-3, and several primary ovarian tumor cultures. In this study we retrospectively examined 90 separate serum specimens for interleukin-6 in 36 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. The mean serum interleukin-6 concentration of those ovarian cancer patients with macroscopic disease (n = 57) was 0.26 +/- 0.04 U/ml (mean +/- SEM). Healthy adult donors have interleukin-6 serum levels of 0.12 +/- 0.03 U/ml. Sixteen of 21 ovarian cancer patients with macroscopic disease (76%) had elevated (greater than 0.20 U/ml) levels of serum interleukin-6, with levels approaching 1 U/ml in some patients (p less than 0.01). Of those nine patients with bulky tumor (residual greater than 2 cm), eight (89%) had an elevated interleukin-6 level (mean, 0.31 +/- 0.05), while eight of 12 (66%) with minimal residual disease (less than 2 cm) had elevated levels. Only two of 15 (13%) patients who were in clinical remission and who had microscopic disease had elevated values. Of the 36 patients, 22 were CA 125 negative (less than 35 U/ml), and of these, four had elevated interleukin-6 levels. Of the 14 patients with an elevated CA 125 level, 12 (86%) had elevated interleukin-6 levels. In those 16 patients in whom serial levels of interleukin-6 were measured, rising levels were found over a 3 to 4 month interval in nine (56%); this correlated with tumor progression. Furthermore, the subsequent survival of patients was shown to correlate with the level of interleukin-6, such that patients whose levels were elevated greater than 0.20 U/ml interleukin-6 survived a mean of 12.5 months, compared with 27.2 months for patients with normal levels (p less than 0.001). These data support the concept that interleukin-6 may be a useful tumor marker in some patients with epithelial ovarian cancer, as it correlates with the tumor burden, clinical disease status, and survival.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991FG94500014

    View details for PubMedID 2014824

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