Frederick M. Dirbas

Publication Details

  • ANTI-TAC-H, A HUMANIZED ANTIBODY TO THE INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR, PROLONGS PRIMATE CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT SURVIVAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Brown, P. S., Parenteau, G. L., Dirbas, F. M., Garsia, R. J., Goldman, C. K., BUKOWSKI, M. A., Junghans, R. P., Queen, C., Hakimi, J., BENJAMIN, W. R., Clark, R. E., Waldmann, T. A. 1991; 88 (7): 2663-2667

    Abstract:

    High-affinity interleukin 2 receptors (IL-2Rs) are expressed by T cells activated in response to foreign histocompatibility antigens but not by normal resting T cells. To exploit this difference in IL-2R expression, anti-Tac-M, a murine monoclonal antibody specific for the IL-2R alpha chain, was used to inhibit organ allograft rejection. However, the use of murine anti-Tac as an immunosuppressive agent was limited by neutralization by human anti-murine antibodies and by weak recruitment of effector functions. To circumvent these difficulties, a humanized antibody to the IL-2R, anti-Tac-H, was prepared. This molecule is human with the exception of the hypervariable segments, which are retained from the mouse. In vivo survival of anti-Tac-H is 2.5-fold longer than simultaneously administered anti-Tac-M (terminal t1/2, 103 hr vs. 38 hr). In addition, anti-Tac-H is less immunogenic than anti-Tac-M when administered to cynomolgus monkeys undergoing heterotopic cardiac allografting. Specifically, all monkeys treated with anti-Tac-M developed measurable anti-anti-Tac-M levels by day 15 (mean onset, 11 days). In contrast, none of the animals receiving anti-Tac-H produced measurable antibodies to this monoclonal antibody before day 33. Finally, there was a prolongation of graft survival in the cynomolgus heterotopic cardiac allograft model in animals receiving anti-Tac. In animals that received anti-Tac-M, the allograft survival was prolonged compared to that of the control group (mean survival, 14 +/- 1.98 days compared to 9.2 +/- 0.48 days; P less than 0.025). Graft survival was further prolonged by anti-Tac-H with a mean survival of 20.0 +/- 0.55 days (compared to controls, P less than 0.001; compared to anti-Tac-M, P less than 0.02). There was no toxicity attributable to the administration of either form of anti-Tac. Thus, anti-Tac-H significantly prolonged allograft survival in primates, without toxic side effects, and may be of value as an adjunct to standard immunosuppressive therapy in humans.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991FE86400011

    View details for PubMedID 2011577

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