Michael S. B. Edwards M.D.

Publication Details

  • HYPERFRACTIONATED IRRADIATION FOR ADULTS WITH BRAIN-STEM GLIOMAS INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS Linstadt, D. E., Edwards, M. S., Prados, M., Larson, D. A., Wara, W. M. 1991; 20 (4): 757-760

    Abstract:

    Hyperfractionated irradiation appears to have improved survival for pediatric patients with brainstem gliomas. However, the efficacy and safety of this technique are less well established for adults with brainstem tumors. In 1984 the UCSF Department of Radiation Oncology began treating adults with brainstem gliomas using 100 cGy fractions given twice daily to total doses ranging between 6600-7800 cGy (median dose 7200 cGy). By the end of 1989, a total of 14 patients had been irradiated with follow-up times for surviving patients ranging between 4-69 months (median follow-up 33 months). Tumor histologies included five moderately anaplastic astrocytomas, one highly anaplastic astrocytoma, and eight which were unbiopsied. At the time of this analysis, six patients had failed locally, with five dying as a result of recurrent tumor. There were no deaths caused by complications or intercurrent illness. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 59%, with a corresponding 3-year actuarial local control rate of 48%. The projected median survival was in excess of 5 years, whereas the actuarial median time to progression was 31 months (134 weeks). The treatments were well tolerated: the mean pretreatment Karnofsky Performance Status was 74% (range 60-90%); at the end of treatment the mean KPS was 78% (range 60-100%). In terms of neurologic status, six patients improved by the end of treatment, seven were stable, and one experienced only minor deterioration without change in KPS. There were no significant long-term complications (specifically, no instances of either radiation brain necrosis or myelitis). Seven patients required prolonged steroid administration after completing radiotherapy; six of these eventually recurred locally. These results appear to be substantially better than those achieved using conventional radiotherapy regimens, and suggest that this technique merits further investigation.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991FC80600016

    View details for PubMedID 2004952

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