Griffith Harsh

Publication Details

  • Passive Antibody-Mediated Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Malignant Gliomas NEUROSURGERY CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Mitra, S., Li, G., Harsh, G. R. 2010; 21 (1): 67-?

    Abstract:

    Despite advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms of brain cancer, the outcome of patients with malignant gliomas treated according to the current standard of care remains poor. Novel therapies are needed, and immunotherapy has emerged with great promise. The diffuse infiltration of malignant gliomas is a major challenge to effective treatment; immunotherapy has the advantage of accessing the entire brain with specificity for tumor cells. Therapeutic immune approaches include cytokine therapy, passive immunotherapy, and active immunotherapy. Cytokine therapy involves the administration of immunomodulatory cytokines to activate the immune system. Active immunotherapy is the generation or augmentation of an immune response, typically by vaccination against tumor antigens. Passive immunotherapy connotes either adoptive therapy, in which tumor-specific immune cells are expanded ex vivo and reintroduced into the patient, or passive antibody-mediated therapy. In this article, the authors discuss the preclinical and clinical studies that have used passive antibody-mediated immunotherapy, otherwise known as serotherapy, for the treatment of malignant gliomas.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.nec.2009.08.010

    View details for Web of Science ID 000278059500007

    View details for PubMedID 19944967

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