Jose R. Maldonado, MD, FAPM

Publication Details

  • Dexmedetomidine and the Reduction of Postoperative Delirium after Cardiac Surgery PSYCHOSOMATICS Maldonado, J. R., Wysong, A., van der Starre, P. J., Block, T., Miller, C., Reitz, B. A. 2009; 50 (3): 206-217

    Abstract:

    Delirium is a neurobehavioral syndrome caused by the transient disruption of normal neuronal activity secondary to systemic disturbances.The authors investigated the effects of postoperative sedation on the development of delirium in patients undergoing cardiac-valve procedures.Patients underwent elective cardiac surgery with a standardized intraoperative anesthesia protocol, followed by random assignment to one of three postoperative sedation protocols: dexmedetomidine, propofol, or midazolam.The incidence of delirium for patients receiving dexmedetomidine was 3%, for those receiving propofol was 50%, and for patients receiving midazolam, 50%. Patients who developed postoperative delirium experienced significantly longer intensive-care stays and longer total hospitalization.The findings of this open-label, randomized clinical investigation suggest that postoperative sedation with dexmedetomidine was associated with significantly lower rates of postoperative delirium and lower care costs.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000267537700004

    View details for PubMedID 19567759

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