Ann M. Arvin

Publication Details

  • MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX RESTRICTION OF T-CELL RESPONSES TO VARICELLA-ZOSTER VIRUS IN GUINEA-PIGS JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY Hayward, A. R., Burger, R., Scheper, R., Arvin, A. M. 1991; 65 (3): 1491-1495

    Abstract:

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV), adapted to grow in guinea pig fibroblasts, was injected subcutaneously into Hartley, strain 2, and strain 13 guinea pigs. Serum immunoglobulin G antibodies were detected 2 weeks later, and T-cell proliferative responses by blood lymphocytes were found 3 weeks after injection. The proliferating cells bound the 155 antibody, which defines a CD4-like subset of guinea pig T lymphocytes. VZV-infected fibroblasts of human, Hartley, and strain 13 origin elicited equivalent amounts of proliferation, which was quantitatively greater than that obtained with an extracted VZV antigen. Uninfected (control) human or guinea pig fibroblasts did not elicit T-cell proliferation. The proliferative response to VZV required the presence of autologous (strain 2 or 13) antigen-presenting cells and was blocked by the addition of an anti-class II major histocompatibility complex antibody. Effector cells obtained from in vitro cultures mediated class II-restricted cytotoxicity to L2C cells incubated with VZV. Class I-restricted responses were obtained only by cross-priming strain 2 animals with strain 13 peritoneal exudate cells which had been preincubated with VZV. The data indicate that guinea pigs resemble humans in that class II-restricted T cells with specificity for VZV are more readily cultured from blood than are class I-restricted cells.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991EY75000051

    View details for PubMedID 1847466

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