Waldo Concepcion

Publication Details

  • LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION - EXPERIENCE WITH 100 CASES WESTERN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Szpakowski, J. L., Cox, K., Nakazato, P., Concepcion, W., Levin, B., Esquivel, C. O. 1991; 155 (5): 494-499

    Abstract:

    Between March 1988 and November 1989, 100 liver transplants were performed on 90 patients at Pacific Presbyterian (now California Pacific) Medical Center in San Francisco. The immunosuppressive regimen was a combination of prophylactic Minnesota antilymphocyte globulin, cyclosporine, and low-dose corticosteroids. Rejections were treated with OKT3, a monoclonal antibody, or corticosteroids. Of the 100 transplants, 32 were done on 30 children, 18 of whom weighed less than 10 kg and 9 of whom received livers that had been surgically reduced in size to fit the recipient. The overall patient survival at 2 years was 85%. Of 100 liver transplants, treatment was given for 80 (80%) for at least 1 episode of rejection. At least 1 episode of serious infection occurred in 34 of the 60 adult patients and 25 of the 30 children. Of the entire group, 2% had hepatic artery thrombosis, and 12% had biliary complications that necessitated reoperation. The quality of life has been good, with a follow-up from 1 to almost 3 years (mean = 22 months). Comparing these data with those of other published series shows a decreased incidence of surgical complications and a lower rate of fungal and viral infections. We attribute this to the reduction of steroid dosage during convalescence without jeopardizing patient or graft survival.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991GP12600003

    View details for PubMedID 1815388

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