Scott Boyd, MD PhD

Publication Details

  • Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens affects clinical outcomes in liver transplant patients LIVER TRANSPLANTATION Boyd, S. D., Stenard, F., Lee, D. K., Goodnough, L. T., Esquivel, C. O., Fontaine, M. J. 2007; 13 (12): 1654-1661

    Abstract:

    Transfusion therapy of liver transplant patients remains a challenge. High volumes of intraoperative blood transfusion have been shown to increase the risk of poor graft or patient survival. We conducted a retrospective study of 209 consecutive liver transplant cases at our institution. Only patients receiving their first liver transplant, with no other simultaneous organ transplants, were included. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to identify clinical variables correlated with postoperative patient mortality. Statistically significant variables for poor patient survival were the number of red blood cell and plasma units transfused, a history of red blood cell alloantibodies, and the immunosuppressive regimen used. History of pregnancy also approached statistical significance but was less robust than the other 3 variables. Our findings suggest that blood transfusion and immune modulation greatly affect the survival of patients after liver transplantation.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/It.21241

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251574100007

    View details for PubMedID 18044783

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