John W. Farquhar, M.D.

Publication Details

  • THE IMPACT OF PUBLIC CHOLESTEROL SCREENING ON DIET, GENERAL WELL-BEING, AND PHYSICIAN REFERRAL AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE Hyman, D. J., Flora, J. A., Reynolds, K. D., JOHANNSSON, M. B., Farquhar, J. W. 1991; 7 (5): 268-272

    Abstract:

    Public cholesterol screenings have become common. To evaluate the public health impact of such events, we conducted a public cholesterol screening and, three months later, invited participants between the ages of 18 and 72 to return for follow-up. More than 77% (N = 143) returned. We collected information on diet and general well-being at baseline and follow-up, and we obtained information on further medical evaluation of the initial cholesterol value at follow-up. Diet improved regardless of baseline cholesterol level (overall diet score 2.10 baseline, 1.75 follow-up, P less than .001). There were no adverse psychosocial ("labeling") effects in persons told of elevated cholesterol levels. About one-third of individuals referred to their physicians for elevated cholesterol values discussed the cholesterol issue with their physicians, as did a similar proportion of those told of a desirable cholesterol level. Total cholesterol decreased from 218.5 to 211.6 mg/dL (P = 0.18, 95% CI for the change, -18.5 to +4.7 mg/dL). Public cholesterol screening did not appear to have any adverse effects and may lead to beneficial changes in diet in persons screened.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991HH02900003

    View details for PubMedID 1790031

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