Suzann Pershing

Publication Details

  • Comparison of anterior vitrectorhexis and continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract and intraocular lens implantation. surgery: A 10-year analysis JOURNAL OF AAPOS Wilson, M. E., Trivedi, R. H., Bartholomew, L. R., Pershing, S. 2007; 11 (5): 443-446

    Abstract:

    To analyze the rate of inadvertent anterior lens capsular tears with vitrectorhexis or continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) in pediatric cataract and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation surgery between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2006.Retrospective chart review, collecting for each eye: age at cataract surgery, type of anterior capsulotomy, any tearing of the capsule, and if yes, details of the tear.A total of 737 eyes were reviewed. Cases with a ruptured lens capsule that occurred prior to surgery were excluded. Eyes that received an anterior capsulotomy by any other method (n = 27) or eyes that did not receive an IOL (n = 100) were reviewed but excluded from final comparative analysis. Of the remaining 339 eyes, 19 eyes (5.6%) were noted to develop an anterior capsule tear (vitrectorhexis, 12 of 226 eyes, 5.3%; CCC, 7 of 113, 6.2%). These tears occurred during anterior capsulotomy in seven eyes, hydrodissection in one, cataract removal in three, and IOL insertion/manipulation in eight. In eyes operated for cataract at or before 72 months of age, the manual CCC technique was more likely to develop a tear (relative risk, 3.09) compared with eyes of older children (>72 months of age), where the vitrectorhexis technique was more likely to develop a tear (relative risk, 3.14).Vitrectorhexis is well suited for use in children less than 6 years of age due to their highly elastic anterior lens capsule. For children aged 6 years and older, manual CCC is the best technique because, by that age, capsule control and ease of capsulotomy completion has improved.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jaapos.2007.03.012

    View details for Web of Science ID 000250386400006

    View details for PubMedID 17532240

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