Mark Holodniy

Publication Details

  • PLASMA VIREMIA IN HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS INFECTION - RELATIONSHIP TO STAGE OF DISEASE AND ANTIVIRAL TREATMENT JOURNAL OF ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES AND HUMAN RETROVIROLOGY Katzenstein, D. A., Holodniy, M., Israelski, D. M., Sengupta, S., Mole, L. A., BUBP, J. L., Merigan, T. C. 1992; 5 (2): 107-112

    Abstract:

    Quantitative culture of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was performed on 121 plasma samples from 76 HIV-infected individuals to determine the sensitivity of the assay at different stages of disease and to measure the effect of antiviral therapy on plasma viremia. Plasma virus was detected in 49 of 76 (64%) of patients, primarily those with AIDS and AIDS-related complex (36 of 38) versus asymptomatic subjects (13 of 38) (p less than 0.001, chi 2). Similarly, plasma cultures were more often positive in patients with less than 250 CD4+ T cells per microliter (38 of 40) than in those with greater than 250 CD4+ T cells per microliter (11 of 36) (p less than 0.001, chi 2). Plasma virus cultures were also more likely to be positive in patients with detectable serum p24 antigen (24 of 26) than in those without detectable p24 antigen (25 of 50) (p = 0.0023, chi 2). An effect of zidovudine (ZDV) treatment on plasma viremia was seen in a comparison of treated and untreated patients with less than 250 CD4+ T cells per microliter. Geometric mean titers of plasma viremia from 16 patients treated with ZDV for more than 3 months were significantly lower than titers from 24 untreated patients (10(1.3) versus 10(2.1), p less than 0.05, Student's t test. A comparison of pre- and posttherapy titers in 33 patients receiving antiviral treatment showed that plasma virus was not detectable at either time in 17 patients; there was a fall in plasma virus titer in 12; and titers were unchanged or increased in 4. In patients with advanced disease, plasma viremia is a potential marker of antiviral drug activity.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992GZ90200001

    View details for PubMedID 1732501

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