Yvonne Maldonado

Publication Details

  • Disease progression among HIV-infected children who receive perinatal zidovudine prophylaxis JAIDS-JOURNAL OF ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES Berk, D. R., Falkovitz-Halpern, M. S., Sullivan, B., Ruiz, J., Maldonado, Y. A. 2007; 44 (1): 106-111

    Abstract:

    Studies of perinatal HIV infection have reported mixed results regarding the prognosis of HIV-infected infants exposed to perinatal zidovudine prophylaxis (PZP).We have followed a population-based cohort of children with perinatal HIV infection to evaluate whether early HIV disease progression was more common among those who received PZP and whether subsequent antiretroviral therapy (ART) was less effective in preventing early disease progression.We identified 73 children with perinatal HIV infection born between 1994 and 2001 with at least 3 years of follow-up and with information concerning PZP administration. Children who received PZP started subsequent ART at an earlier age than those who did not receive PZP (median age at starting treatment: 2 months for PZP vs. 6 months for no PZP; P = 0.0002). PZP was associated with decreased early HIV progression: 21% (7 of 33) of children who received PZP progressed to a category C diagnosis by 3 years compared with 45% (18 of 40) of children who did not receive PZP (P = 0.047). Children who did not receive PZP progressed to a category C diagnosis at a younger age than children who received PZP (median: 4 vs. 11 months; P = 0.061). ART was as effective in preventing early HIV progression in children who received PZP as in children who did not receive PZP.In our population-based cohort of perinatally HIV-infected children, those who received PZP started ART at a significantly earlier age than those who did not receive PZP and also demonstrated decreased HIV disease progression by the age of 3 years.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000243189400016

    View details for PubMedID 17075392

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