Gerald Berry

Publication Details

  • GROWTH FRACTION ESTIMATION OF MALIGNANT-LYMPHOMAS IN FORMALIN-FIXED PARAFFIN-EMBEDDED TISSUE USING ANTI-PCNA CYCLIN 19A2 - CORRELATION WITH KI-67 LABELING AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY Kamel, O. W., LeBrun, D. P., Davis, R. E., Berry, G. J., Warnke, R. A. 1991; 138 (6): 1471-1477

    Abstract:

    The immunohistochemical detection of PCNA/Cyclin, a nuclear protein associated with cell proliferation, represents a potentially useful tool for the study of tumor proliferative activity. Previous studies investigating the reactivity of anti-PCNA/Cyclin monoclonal antibody 19A2 have not clearly defined the population of proliferating cells with which 19A2 reacts in tissue sections. The authors describe a method for detection of PCNA/Cyclin in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue using a routine biotin-streptavidin immunohistochemical system that employs an anti-IgM, mu-chain-specific second-stage antibody. The authors used this method to study the proliferative activity of 24 malignant lymphomas, consisting of 12 low-grade lymphomas (LGLs) and 12 intermediate-grade lymphomas (IGLs), and five reactive tonsils. 19A2 data was compared with Ki-67 labeling in frozen sections in the same group of cases. 19A2 provided easily detectable nuclear staining of proliferating cells with reactive cells demonstrating varying intensity of staining, this latter finding most likely due to the varying nuclear concentration of PCNA/Cyclin protein during the cell cycle. In tonsils, 19A2 reacted with germinal center cells and basal keratinocytes. In the malignant lymphomas, there was good correlation between 19A2 and Ki-67 data (r = 0.90, P less than 0.001). The subgroup of LGLs showed a mean PCNA/Cyclin of 26% and a mean Ki-67 of 28%. In the subgroup of IGLs, mean PCNA/Cyclin = 54% and mean Ki-67 = 59%. These results indicate that 19A2 detects a fraction of proliferating cells that is similar to that detected by Ki-67, ie, the growth fraction, and that 19A2 is a reliable marker of proliferative activity in uniformly handled, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991FR74600018

    View details for PubMedID 1675840

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