Edward Riley

Publication Details

  • Walking with labor epidural analgesia - The impact of bupivacaine concentration and a lidocaine-epinephrine test dose Cohen, S. E., Yeh, J. Y., Riley, E. T., Vogel, T. M. LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS. 2000: 387-392

    Abstract:

    Regional analgesia techniques for labor that permit ambulation are popular among parturients. This study evaluated the influence of bupivacaine bolus concentration and a 3-ml 1.5% lidocaine-epinephrine test dose, on analgesic effectiveness and the ability to walk after block placement.Using a randomized double-blind study design, epidural analgesia was initiated in 60 parturients undergoing labor as follows: Group TD/B.0625 received a 3-ml lidocaine-epinephrine test dose + 12 ml bupivacaine, 0.0625%; group TD/B.125 received a 3-ml test dose + 12 ml bupivacaine, 0.125%; group B.0625 received 15 ml bupivacaine, 0.0625% (no test dose); and group B.125 received 15 ml bupivacaine, 0.125% (no test dose). Initial boluses in all groups contained 10 microg sufentanil. Bupivacaine, 0.0625%, with 0.33 microg/ml sufentanil was infused throughout labor at 13.5-15 ml/h. Analgesia balance, proprioception, motor block, and patient ability to stand and walk were evaluated at various intervals.A bolus of 0.125% bupivacaine containing sufentanil, without a previous test dose, proved to be optimal with respect to analgesia and early ambulation. When a test dose was given before bupivacaine, 0.125%, fewer women walked within 1 h of block placement. Bupivacaine, 0.0625%, with sufentanil, with or without a test dose, provided inadequate analgesia, necessitating additional bupivacaine, which impaired the ability to walk. A high percentage of women in all groups (73-93%) walked at some stage during labor.Omitting a lidocaine-epinephrine test dose and using 0.125% bupivacaine for the initial bolus should permit ambulation in the early postblock period for most parturients who elect this option.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000085078600015

    View details for PubMedID 10691224

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