Philip A. Pizzo, M.D.

Publication Details

  • BACTERIAL-INFECTIONS IN HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS TYPE-1-INFECTED CHILDREN - THE IMPACT OF CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETERS AND ANTIRETROVIRAL AGENTS PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL Roilides, E., Marshall, D., Venzon, D., Butler, K., Husson, R., Pizzo, P. A. 1991; 10 (11): 813-819

    Abstract:

    We conducted a retrospective study to analyze the impact of central venous catheters (CVCs) and antiretroviral therapy on the frequency and the patterns of bacterial infections in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus during a 3-year period. Among 204 bacterial infections other than otitis media reviewed, soft tissue infection (n = 69), bacteremia (n = 57), pneumonia (n = 27) and sinusitis (n = 27) were encountered most frequently. Catheter-related staphylococcal infection was the most common infection in children with CVCs, particularly in those who were less than 6 years old. In children without CVCs, Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequent organism. Younger children had more CVC-related infections whereas children with lower CD4 counts had more CVC-related and CVC-unrelated infections. A lower frequency of CVC-unrelated infections was detected in patients who received antiretroviral therapy, especially those receiving a continuous infusion of zidovudine. These data suggest that increased frequency and altered patterns of bacterial infections are associated with the use of CVCs in these patients, but antiretroviral therapy may reduce the frequency of CVC-unrelated infections.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991GP04800005

    View details for PubMedID 1661003

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