David N. Cornfield

Publication Details

  • Chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension selectively modifies pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell gene expression AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-LUNG CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR PHYSIOLOGY Resnik, E., Herron, J., Keck, M., Sukovich, D., Linden, B., Cornfield, D. N. 2006; 290 (3): L426-L432

    Abstract:

    Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) relaxation at birth results from an increase in cytosolic cGMP, cGMP-dependent and kinase-mediated activation of the Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel (KCa), and closure of voltage-operated Ca2+ channels (VOCC). How chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension compromises perinatal pulmonary vasodilation remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension selectively modifies gene expression to mitigate perinatal pulmonary vasodilation mediated by the cGMP kinase-KCa-VOCC pathway. PASMC were isolated from late-gestation fetal lambs that had undergone either ligation of the ductus arteriosus (hypertensive) or sham operation (control) at 127 days of gestation and were maintained under either hypoxic (approximately 25 Torr) or normoxic (approximately 120 Torr) conditions in primary culture. We studied mRNA levels for cGMP kinase Ialpha (PKG-1alpha), the alpha-chain of VOCC (Cav1.2), and the alpha-subunit of the KCa channel. Compared with control PASMC, hypertensive PASMC had decreased VOCC, KCa, and PKG-1alpha expression. In response to sustained normoxia, expression of VOCC and KCa channel decreased and expression of PKG-1alpha increased. In contrast, sustained normoxia had no effect on PKG-1alpha levels and an attenuated effect on VOCC and KCa channel expression in hypertensive PASMC. Protein expression of PKG-1alpha was consistent with the mRNA data. We conclude that chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension decreases PKG expression and mitigates the genetic effects of sustained normoxia on pulmonary vasodilation, because gene expression remains compromised even after sustained exposure to normoxia.

    View details for DOI 10.1152/ajplung.00281.2005

    View details for Web of Science ID 000235182700002

    View details for PubMedID 16467248

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