Julie Parsonnet

Publication Details

  • Helicobacter pylori infection in different generations of Hispanics in the San Francisco Bay Area AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY Tsai, C. J., Perry, S., Sanchez, L., Parsonnet, J. 2005; 162 (4): 351-357

    Abstract:

    To quantify the contributions of household and environmental factors to Helicobacter pylori infection, the authors examined H. pylori infection among several generations of Hispanics in the San Francisco Bay Area. Between 2000 and 2004, household members were tested for H. pylori and interviewed about demographic factors and household pedigree. An immigrant was defined as someone born in Latin America with at least one Latin America-born parent; a first-generation US-born Hispanic was defined as someone born in the United States with at least one Latin America-born parent; and a second-generation US-born Hispanic was defined as someone born in the United States with at least one US-born parent. Prevalences of H. pylori in immigrants and first- and second-generation US-born Hispanics were 31.4% (102/325), 9.1% (98/1,076), and 3.1% (2/64), respectively. Compared with second-generation US-born Hispanics, the age-adjusted odds ratios for H. pylori were 9.70 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.57, 60.00) for immigrants and 4.32 (95% CI: 0.69, 26.96) for first-generation US-born Hispanics (p(trend) < 0.001). These odds ratios decreased to 6.19 (95% CI: 1.13, 33.77) and 3.24 (95% CI: 0.59, 17.82), respectively, after adjustment for parental infection (odds ratio (OR) = 2.94, 95% CI: 1.59, 4.38), low education (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.20, 2.68), and crowding (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.79). Both the household and birth-country environments probably contributed to declining H. pylori prevalence among successive generations of Hispanics.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/aje/kwi207

    View details for Web of Science ID 000231150600008

    View details for PubMedID 16014772

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