Inder Perkash

Publication Details

  • USE OF PENILE PROSTHESES TO MAINTAIN EXTERNAL CONDOM CATHETER DRAINAGE IN SPINAL-CORD INJURY PATIENTS PARAPLEGIA Perkash, I., Kabalin, J. N., Lennon, S., Wolfe, V. 1992; 30 (5): 327-332

    Abstract:

    This is a retrospective analysis of 79 spinal cord injury patients who have had penile implants from one to 14 years. The primary indication for implants was the loss of condom catheter with a small retractile penis. Mean period after injury to when the implants were placed was 8.24 years (range 1-21 years). Mean total length of time the implants have been followed was 7.08 years (1-14 years). Sixty patients responded to our detailed questionnaire and they have been subjected to further analysis: prior to the implant 46 patients (77%) frequently lost their condoms. Fourteen of the patients (23%) had indwelling catheters, and 3 (5%) had a suprapubic cystostomy since they could not retain an external condom for urinary drainage because of retraction of a small penis. Post implant, 81% of patients had no accidents involving condom loss, while 19% still lost condoms. All indwelling catheters could be removed except for one patient who continued with a suprapubic catheter following transurethral sphincterotomy (TURS) and a penile implant. Sixty-eight percent used the implant for sex and felt their wives were satisfied. Patient satisfaction survey showed a markedly increased self esteem, increased mobility without fear of condom loss, and an improved sex life. Overall, the long term prosthesis failure rate was 8%. The specific infection complication rate was less than 2%. The Flexirod semirigid, hinged prosthesis proved ideal in meeting the requirements for these patients.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JV19100003

    View details for PubMedID 1598171

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