Eric R. Sokol, MD

Publication Details

  • Suburethral sting treatment of occult stress incontinence and intrinsic sphincter deficiency in women with severe vaginal prolapse of the anterior vs posterior/apical compartment AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Clemons, J. L., Aguilar, V. C., Sokol, E. R., Sung, V. W., Myers, D. L. 2005; 192 (5): 1566-1572

    Abstract:

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of a Mersilene mesh suburethral sling for occult stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD) in women with severe vaginal prolapse of the anterior compartment to the posterior/apical compartment.This was a retrospective study that compared women with stage or grade III/IV prolapse of the anterior compartment (group 1) with the posterior/apical compartment (group 2); both groups demonstrated occult SUI (leakage only with prolapse reduced) and ISD on urodynamics, and underwent concurrent pelvic reconstructive surgery. The sling was defined as efficacious if SUI was prevented in 85% of women and if obstructive symptoms (de novo or worsening urge incontinence, or urinary retention greater than 2 weeks) occurred in less than 10% of women.There were 39 women in group 1 and 25 women in group 2. There were no differences between women in group 1 or group 2 in preoperative demographics (except parity) or urodynamic findings. SUI cure rates were lower for group 1 than group 2, but this difference was not significant (87% vs 100%, P = .15). Rates of de novo or worsening urge incontinence (8% vs 4%, P = 1.00) and urinary retention (none occurred) were similar between groups.In women with severe vaginal prolapse, slings effectively treat occult SUI and ISD, whether associated with anterior or posterior/apical prolapse.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ajog.2004.11.041

    View details for Web of Science ID 000229384100051

    View details for PubMedID 15902159

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