Heike Daldrup-Link

Publication Details

  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells from umbilical cord blood and from peripheral blood for subsequent in vivo tracking in a xenotransplant mouse model XXX ACADEMIC RADIOLOGY Daldrup-Link, H. E., Rudelius, M., Oostendorp, R. A., Jacobs, V. R., Simon, G. H., Gooding, C., Rummeny, E. J. 2005; 12 (4): 502-510

    Abstract:

    To compare and optimize ferumoxides labeling of human hematopoietic progenitor cells from umbilical cord blood and from peripheral blood for subsequent in vivo tracking with a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner.Human hematopoietic progenitor cells, derived from umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood, were labeled with Ferumoxides by simple incubation or lipofection. Cellular iron uptake was quantified with spectrometry. Then, 3 x 10(7)-labeled cells were injected into the tail vein of 12 female nude Balb/c mice. The mice underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and 24 hours after injection. Precontrast and postcontrast signal intensities of liver, spleen, and bone marrow were measured and tested for significant differences with the t-test. Immunostains served as a histopathologic standard of reference.After labeling by simple incubation, only umbilical cord blood cells, but not peripheral blood cells, showed a significant iron uptake and could be tracked in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging. Using lipofection, both cell types could be tracked in vivo. A significant decline in signal intensity was observed in liver, spleen, and bone marrow at 24 hours after injection of efficiently labeled ferumoxides cells (P < .05). Histopathology proved the distribution of iron oxide-labeled cells to these organs.Hematopoietic progenitor cells from umbilical cord blood can be labeled by simple incubation with an Food and Drug Administration-approved magnetic resonance contrast agent with sufficient efficiency to provide an in vivo cell tracking at 1.5 T. Progenitor cells from peripheral blood need to be labeled with adjunctive transfection techniques to be depicted in vivo at 1.5 T.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.acra.2004.12.021

    View details for Web of Science ID 000228415300015

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