Darrell Wilson

Publication Details

  • Accuracy of the modified Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS) sensor in an outpatient setting: results from a diabetes research in children network (DirecNet) study. Diabetes technology & therapeutics Tansey, M. J., Beck, R. W., Buckingham, B. A., Mauras, N., Fiallo-Scharer, R., Xing, D., Killman, C., Tamborlane, W. V., Ruedy, K. J. 2005; 7 (1): 109-114

    Abstract:

    We previously reported the results of an inpatient accuracy study in children with type 1 diabetes using the Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS, Medtronic MiniMed, Northridge, CA). During the course of that study, a new process was implemented for manufacturing the CGMS sensor. Accuracy from the resulting modified sensor used by only 14 children was significantly better than the original version [median relative absolute difference (RAD), 11% vs. 19%; P < 0.001]. Baseline data from a subsequent outpatient study provide an opportunity to further assess the accuracy of the modified sensor in a much larger sample of children with type 1 diabetes.As part of a randomized trial to assess the utility of the GlucoWatch G2 Biographer (Cygnus, Inc., Redwood City, CA), 200 children with type 1 diabetes were instructed to wear a CGMS for 48-72 h in an outpatient setting at baseline. Glucose measurements from a OneTouch UltraSmart (Lifescan, Inc., Milpitas, CA) home glucose meter were downloaded and used as reference values to calculate accuracy measures.The overall median RAD was 12%. Accuracy was better during hyperglycemia than during hypoglycemia (median RAD, 10% vs. 20%; P < 0.001) and on optimal versus non-optimal days but did not vary significantly by the number of calibrations entered.These data confirm the improved accuracy previously reported for the modified version of the CGMS sensor.

    View details for PubMedID 15738708

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: