Lucy Tompkins

Publication Details

  • CHARACTERIZATION OF HELICOBACTER-PYLORI UREASE MUTANTS INFECTION AND IMMUNITY Segal, E. D., Shon, J., Tompkins, L. S. 1992; 60 (5): 1883-1889

    Abstract:

    The association between Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, and peptic ulcer is well established, and the association of infection with gastric cancer has been noted in several developing countries. However, the pathogenic mechanism(s) leading to disease states has not been elucidated. The H. pylori urease is thought to be a determinant of pathogenicity, since the enzyme is produced by all H. pylori clinical isolates. Evidence indicates that some H. pylori strains are more cytotoxic than others, with a correlation between the activity of the urease and the presence of a vacuolating cytotoxin having been made. However, the number of cytotoxins remains unknown at this time. The relationship between the urease and cytotoxicity has previously been examined with chemical inhibitors. To examine the role of the urease and its relationship to cytotoxicity, urease-deficient mutants were produced following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of H. pylori 87A300. Two mutants (the ure1 and ure5 mutants) which were entirely deficient in urease activity (Ure-) were selected. Characterization of the isolates at the protein level showed that the urease subunits lacked the ability to complex and form the active urease enzyme. The ure1 mutant was shown to be sensitive to the effects of low pH in vitro and exhibited no cytotoxicity to eucaryotic cells, whereas the parental strain (Ure+) produced a cytotoxic effect in the presence of urea. Interaction between the H. pylori Ure+ and Ure- strains and Caco-2 cells appeared to be similar in that both bacterial types elicited pedestal formation and actin condensation. These results indicate that the H. pylori urease may have many functions, among them (i) protecting H. pylori against the acidic environment of the stomach, (ii) acting as a cytotoxin, with human gastric cells especially susceptible to its activity, and (iii) disrupting cell tight junctions in such a manner that the cells remain viable but an ionic flow between the cells occurs.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HR06500025

    View details for PubMedID 1563778

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: