Michael D. Dake

Publication Details

  • Local resistance to oxidative stress by overexpression of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase limits neointimal formation after angioplasty JOURNAL OF ENDOVASCULAR THERAPY Kuo, M. D., Bright, I. J., Wang, D. S., Ghafouri, P., Yuksel, E., Hilfiker, P. R., Miniati, D. N., Dake, M. D. 2004; 11 (6): 585-594

    Abstract:

    To examine the effects of oxidative stress on neointimal hyperplasia through local overexpression of human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD).The left common femoral arteries (CFA) of 18 New Zealand white rabbits were subjected to balloon overdilation injury. Each dilated CFA was then incubated with either a nonviral (buffer) or viral (adenovirus overexpressing beta-galactosidase) control or an adenovirus overexpressing Cu-Zn SOD. Animals were then sacrificed at 3, 7, or 28 days (3 arteries per group per time point) and the treated CFA segments were harvested for analysis of esterase-positive inflammatory cells and extracellular matrix elements. The intima-to-media ratio (I/M) was measured to assess the degree of neointimal formation.At 3 days, local SOD levels in the Cu-Zn SOD-treated group were significantly elevated relative to both controls (p<0.01). Significant reductions in lipid peroxidation byproducts were also seen in the SOD group relative to viral and nonviral controls (p<0.05). Mean I/M at 28 days was 0.582+/-0.088 for the nonviral control group versus 0.565+/-0.133 for the viral control group. The SOD-treated group had a significant reduction relative to both controls: 0.259+/-0.045 (p<0.05). Statistically significant reductions in I/M were also demonstrated in the SOD group relative to control groups at 7 days (p<0.05). The SOD-treated group demonstrated significant preservation of elastin relative to controls, as well as a significant reduction in esterase-positive granulocytes relative to controls (p<0.05).Direct buffering of oxidative stress in balloon-injured vessels can significantly alter postinjury response and limit neointimal hyperplasia.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000226315200002

    View details for PubMedID 15615548

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