Ricardo Castillo

Publication Details

  • ALTERATIONS IN POSTNATAL INTESTINAL FUNCTION DURING CHRONIC HYPOXEMIA PEDIATRIC RESEARCH Bernstein, D., Bell, J. G., Kwong, L., Castillo, R. O. 1992; 31 (3): 234-238

    Abstract:

    Growth failure is a major complication of chronic hypoxemia, as seen in infants and children with cyanotic congenital heart disease. To determine whether chronic hypoxemia during infancy affects the gastrointestinal tract, we examined small intestinal growth and digestive enzyme activities in chronically hypoxemic newborn lambs and in age-matched controls. Chronic hypoxemia was produced by placing an inflatable occluder around the main pulmonary artery and performing a balloon atrial septostomy. Aortic oxygen saturation was reduced to 60-74% for 2 wk, after which the small intestine was removed for analysis. During chronic hypoxemia, somatic growth rate was decreased to 60% of control (hypoxemic, 135 +/- 20 versus control, 216 +/- 26 g/d, p less than 0.02). No differences in caloric intake were found (hypoxemic, 129 +/- 4 versus control, 128 +/- 4 kcal/kg/d). Chronic hypoxemia did not alter small intestinal growth, as measured by jejuno-ileal weight, jejuno-ileal length, mucosal weight, or mucosal protein or DNA contents. However, sp act of lactase, the principal disaccharidase of the infant lamb intestine, were significantly decreased (hypoxemic, 0.08 +/- 0.01 versus control, 0.146 +/- 0.03 units of enzyme activity/mg DNA, p less than 0.05), as were the total small intestinal contents of lactase (hypoxemic, 61.7 +/- 7.0 versus control, 120.6 +/- 21.7 units of enzyme activity, p less than 0.01). There also were decreases in specific and total activities of other digestive enzymes such as maltase, amino-oligopeptidase, and alkaline phosphatase in hypoxemic intestine that did not achieve statistical significance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992HF34600007

    View details for PubMedID 1561008

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