Chandra Ramamoorthy

Publication Details

  • AGGRESSIVE HYDRATION DURING CONTINUOUS POSITIVE-PRESSURE VENTILATION RESTORES ATRIAL TRANSMURAL PRESSURE, PLASMA ATRIAL-NATRIURETIC-PEPTIDE CONCENTRATIONS, AND RENAL-FUNCTION CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE Ramamoorthy, C., Rooney, M. W., Dries, D. J., Mathru, M. 1992; 20 (7): 1014-1019

    Abstract:

    The correlations between continuous positive-pressure ventilation-induced antidiuresis/antinatriuresis, atrial transmural pressure, and atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations have not been clarified. The purpose of the present study was to use aggressive hydration to restore atrial transmural pressure during continuous positive-pressure ventilation and to test for correlations of atrial transmural pressure, atrial natriuretic peptide concentration, diuresis, and natriuresis during this intervention. An intrapleural catheter was used to measure atrial transmural pressure in three ways: a) right atrial pressure minus intrapleural pressure, b) left ventricular end-diastolic pressure minus intrapleural pressure, and c) pulmonary artery occlusion pressure minus intrapleural pressure. Hemodynamic, atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations, and renal measurements were made in 12 anesthetized closed-chest dogs during baseline (intermittent positive-pressure ventilation), during continuous positive-pressure ventilation), during continuous positive-pressure ventilation with 10 cm H2O end-expiratory pressure, and during continuous positive-pressure ventilation plus aggressive hydration (approximately 60 mL/kg lactated Ringer's solution). Pearson's correlation matrix was used to generate all possible correlation coefficients between the three atrial transmural pressures, atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations, urine output, and urine sodium excretion.Application of continuous positive-pressure ventilation resulted in a 60% decrease in right atrial transmural pressure (p less than .05), a 51% decrease in left ventricular end-diastolic transmural pressure (p less than .05), and a 26% decrease in pulmonary artery occlusion transmural pressure (p less than .05) from baseline. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide concentration decreased from 80 +/- 12 (SEM) pg/mL at baseline to 49 +/- 8 pg/mL during continuous positive-pressure ventilation (p less than .05). Both urine output and sodium excretion decreased by 81% (p less than .05). After aggressive hydration with lactated Ringer's solution during continuous positive-pressure ventilation, to restore atrial transmural pressure to baseline, plasma atrial natriuretic peptide concentration returned to baseline values (81 +/- 12 pg/mL) as did urine output and sodium excretion. Correlation indices (r2 values) between transmural pressure, atrial natriuretic peptide concentration, urine output, and sodium excretion ranged from .835 to .994. Multivariate analysis of covariance demonstrated significant (p less than .05) temporal dependence between the three transmural pressures, atrial natriuretic peptide concentration, urine output, and sodium excretion.The results demonstrate that aggressive hydration during continuous positive-pressure ventilation will restore diuresis and natriuresis and that this response correlates significantly with atrial transmural filling pressure and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide concentration.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JD80400019

    View details for PubMedID 1535581

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