Steven Foung

Publication Details

  • Hepatitis C virus E2 has three immunogenic domains containing conformational epitopes with distinct properties and biological functions JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY Keck, Z. Y., Op de Beeck, A., Hadlock, K. G., Xia, J. M., LI, T. K., Dubuisson, J., Foung, S. K. 2004; 78 (17): 9224-9232

    Abstract:

    Mechanisms of virion attachment, interaction with its receptor, and cell entry are poorly understood for hepatitis C virus (HCV) because of a lack of an efficient and reliable in vitro system for virus propagation. Infectious HCV retroviral pseudotype particles (HCVpp) were recently shown to express native E1E2 glycoproteins, as defined in part by HCV human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) to conformational epitopes on E2, and some of these antibodies block HCVpp infection (A. Op De Beeck, C. Voisset, B. Bartosch, Y. Ciczora, L. Cocquerel, Z. Y. Keck, S. Foung, F. L. Cosset, and J. Dubuisson, J. Virol. 78:2994-3002, 2004). Why some HMAbs are neutralizing and others are nonneutralizing is looked at in this report by a series of studies to determine the expression of their epitopes on E2 associated with HCVpp and the role of antibody binding affinity. Antibody cross-competition defined three E2 immunogenic domains with neutralizing HMAbs restricted to two domains that were also able to block E2 interaction with CD81, a putative receptor for HCV. HCVpp immunoprecipitation showed that neutralizing and nonneutralizing domains are expressed on E2 associated with HCVpp, and affinity studies found moderate-to-high-affinity antibodies in all domains. These findings support the perspective that HCV-specific epitopes are responsible for functional steps in virus infection, with specific antibodies blocking distinct steps of virus attachment and entry, rather than the perspective that virus neutralization correlates with increased antibody binding to any virion surface site, independent of the epitope recognized by the antibody. Segregation of virus neutralization and sensitivity to low pH to specific regions supports a model of HCV E2 immunogenic domains similar to the antigenic structural and functional domains of other flavivirus envelope E glycoproteins.

    View details for DOI 10.1128/JVI.78.17.9224-9232.2004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223386600026

    View details for PubMedID 15308717

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