Geoffrey Gurtner

Publication Details

  • Electromagnetic fields increase in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis through endothelial release of FGF-2. FASEB journal Tepper, O. M., Callaghan, M. J., Chang, E. I., Galiano, R. D., Bhatt, K. A., Baharestani, S., Gan, J., Simon, B., Hopper, R. A., Levine, J. P., Gurtner, G. C. 2004; 18 (11): 1231-1233

    Abstract:

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have been shown to be clinically beneficial, but their mechanism of action remains unclear. The present study examined the impact of PEMF on angiogenesis, a process critical for successful healing of various tissues. PEMF increased the degree of endothelial cell tubulization (sevenfold) and proliferation (threefold) in vitro. Media from PEMF cultures had a similar stimulatory effect, but heat denaturation ablated this activity. In addition, conditioned media was able to induce proliferative and chemotactic changes in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and fibroblasts, but had no effect on osteoblasts. Angiogenic protein screening demonstrated a fivefold increase in fibroblast growth factor beta-2 (FGF-2), as well as smaller increases in other angiogenic growth factors (angiopoietin-2, thrombopoietin, and epidermal growth factor). Northern blot analysis demonstrated an increase in FGF-2 transcription, and FGF-2 neutralizing antibody inhibited the effects of PEMF. In vivo, PEMF exposure increased angiogenesis more than twofold. We conclude that PEMF augments angiogenesis primarily by stimulating endothelial release of FGF-2, inducing paracrine and autocrine changes in the surrounding tissue. These findings suggest a potential role for PEMF in therapeutic angiogenesis.

    View details for PubMedID 15208265

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