Sharon Hunt, MD

Publication Details

  • ACCELERATED GRAFT CORONARY-ARTERY DISEASE - DIAGNOSIS AND PREVENTION Schroeder, J. S., Gao, S. Z., Hunt, S. A., Stinson, E. B. MOSBY-YEAR BOOK INC. 1992: S258-S266

    Abstract:

    Accelerated graft coronary artery disease (CAD) has become a major factor limiting survival among long-term heart transplant survivors. Currently 14%, 37%, and 50% of patients treated with triple therapy have angiographically apparent accelerated graft CAD at 1, 3, and 5 years after transplantation. Because cardiac allografts are denervated, transplant recipients generally do not experience angina pectoris. Therefore accelerated graft CAD may present as silent myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, or ventricular arrhythmia leading to syncope or sudden death. Noninvasive tests for CAD have been insensitive for the detection of accelerated graft CAD because of the diffuse nature of the disease. Coronary arteriographic characteristics of accelerated graft CAD are a mixture of typical focal atherosclerotic lesions and unusual diffuse, concentric, and longitudinal narrowing prominent in middle to distal coronary vessels, with distal vessel obliteration and lack of collateral vessel formation. The presence and severity of accelerated graft CAD may be underestimated by routine angiography because of its diffuse and concentric nature. Quantitative arteriography has become an important technique to assess the progression of accelerated graft CAD. Intravascular ultrasound imaging can detect even earlier development of intimal thickening. CAD risk factor modification has had little impact on the overall incidence. We initiated a randomized study of diltiazem versus no calcium blocker to determine if this may prevent accelerated graft CAD. Patients have undergone early postoperative and annual quantitative coronary angiography since inception of the study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JJ43700019

    View details for PubMedID 1515448

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