Heidi M. Feldman

Publication Details

  • A FLUENT LANGUAGE DISORDER FOLLOWING ANTEPARTUM LEFT-HEMISPHERE BRAIN INJURY JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION DISORDERS Feldman, H. M., Holland, A. L., BROWN, R. E. 1992; 25 (2-3): 125-142

    Abstract:

    This article describes the development of language in a left-handed girl with a left middle cerebral artery infarction. Seven language samples of parent-child interaction, obtained when she was between 36 and 60 months of age, were transcribed and analyzed using the Child Language Data Exchange System. At 36 months of age, only 42 (20%) of the child's 214 utterances contained words; the other 80% were composed of jargon or interactional markers such as "uh-huh" and "uhn-uhn." Jargon incorporated familiar intonational contours and prosodic features to convey emotional states and communicative functions. Between 36 and 45 months of age, her jargon became differentiated into increasing approximations of English sentences. Simultaneously, her use of words and word combinations increased. By 54 months of age, no jargon was heard. The pattern of development observed in this child can be described as a transient jargon or fluent aphasia. It may have resulted from initial reliance on an uninjured right hemisphere. However, given the similarity between this pattern and the expressive or gestalt style of learning seen in some normal children, the pattern may also be related to other variables including characteristics of the parental input.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992KE88400003

    View details for PubMedID 1487564

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