Christian Guilleminault

Publication Details

  • FROM OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP-APNEA SYNDROME TO UPPER AIRWAY-RESISTANCE SYNDROME - CONSISTENCY OF DAYTIME SLEEPINESS SLEEP Guilleminault, C., Stoohs, R., Clerk, A., Simmons, J., LABANOWSKI, M. 1992; 15 (6): S13-S16

    Abstract:

    Some patients with excessive daytime sleepiness who do not present the features of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) present a sleep fragmentation due to transient alpha EEG arousals lasting between three and 14 seconds. These transient EEG arousals are related to an abnormal amount of breathing effort, indicated by peak inspiratory esophageal pressure (Pes) nadir. In the studied population, these increased efforts were associated with snoring. Usage of nasal CPAP, titrated on Pes nadir values, for several weeks eliminated subjective daytime sleepiness and improved Multiple Sleep Latency Test scores from baseline evaluations. Patients suspected of CNS hypersomnia should be asked about continuous snoring, and their clinical evaluation should include a good review of maxillo-mandibular and upper airway anatomy.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992KC80800004

    View details for PubMedID 1470801

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