Christian Guilleminault

Publication Details

  • FROM APNEA OF INFANCY TO OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP-APNEA SYNDROME IN THE YOUNG-CHILD CHEST Guilleminault, C., Stoohs, R. 1992; 102 (4): 1065-1071

    Abstract:

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and heavy snoring during sleep, without sleep apnea, has been well described in children and adults. We report a case series of 25 full-term infants, prospectively obtained from a database of nearly 700 "apparent life-threatening event" (ALTE) cases, who presented between 3 weeks and 4 1/2 months of age an ALTE and who progressively developed more florid symptomatology and polygraphic findings. All of them were classified as OSAS patients by five years of age. These index cases are compared with two other ALTE infant groups followed in parallel during the first year of life but whose symptoms were short-lived. The index cases presented more frequently a positive family history of OSAS and an early report of snoring or noisy breathing during sleep. Usage of an esophageal balloon to monitor esophageal pressure (Pes) and usage of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as a test may help in the early recognition of these infants, who appear to make more effort to breathe during sleep, based on the indirect evidence of Pes measurements. It is suggested that anatomic features, including a small posterior airway space leading to an abnormal degree of upper airway resistance, may be the cause of the symptoms presented by these infants. Considering the parental anxiety generated by persistence of symptoms after the first year of life in ALTE infants, recognition of this subgroup is important.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JR49500018

    View details for PubMedID 1395744

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: