Suzann Pershing

Publication Details

  • Trends in ophthalmic manifestations of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a northern California pediatric population JOURNAL OF AAPOS Amato, M., Pershing, S., Walvick, M., Tanaka, S. 2013; 17 (3): 243-247

    Abstract:

    To determine pediatric clinical trends of ocular and periocular methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a large northern California healthcare system.This study was a retrospective cross-sectional review of all pediatric cases (aged 0-18) with culture-positive ophthalmic MRSA isolates identified between January 2002 and December 2009. Medical record review included history, presentation, infection site, acquisition (community or nosocomial), antibiotic sensitivity/resistance, treatment, and clinical outcome. Incidence was classified by year, sex, and age. Parameters were analyzed for statistical significance by trend and χ(2) analysis.A total of 399 ocular and periocular MRSA cases were included. Cases trended upward from 2002 to 2009, peaking in 2006. Of the 137 pediatric cases (0-18 years), 58% were community acquired. Conjunctivitis was the predominant presentation (40%), followed by stye/chalazion (25%), orbital cellulitis/abscess (19%), dacryocystitis (11%) and brow abscess (3%). Significant predictors for ocular infection with MRSA included male sex (61%), neonates (38%), and multiple infection sites on the body (38%). Resistance was high to bacitracin (80.9%) and ofloxacin (48.3%) but remained low for trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (8.7%). Topical therapy was effective in 29% of cases; oral antibiotics, in 47%. Intravenous therapy was required in 12% of cases and incision/drainage or surgery in 19%. Initial oral antibiotic treatment, primarily cephalosporins (24%), was ineffective in 37% of patients. There was a significant increase in resistance to antibiotic therapy (P < 0.001) during the study period. No patients developed permanent visual impairment.Pediatric ocular and periocular MRSA is increasing in incidence and resistance in our patient population. Outcomes can be improved by early recognition, proper antibiotic selection, and obtaining cultures and sensitivities when resistant or severe ocular infections are present.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jaapos.2012.12.151

    View details for Web of Science ID 000321224900004

    View details for PubMedID 23623773

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