Michael Greicius

Publication Details

  • Blockade of central cholinergic receptors impairs new learning and increases proactive interference in a word paired-associate memory task BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE Atri, A., Sherman, S., Norman, K. A., Kirchhoff, B. A., Nicolas, M. M., Greicius, M. D., Cramer, S. C., Breiter, H. C., Hasselmo, M. E., Stern, C. E. 2004; 118 (1): 223-236

    Abstract:

    Experimental data and computational models suggest that blockade of muscarinic cholinergic receptors impairs paired-associate learning and increases proactive interference (E. DeRosa & M. E. Hasselmo, 2000; M. E. Hasselmo & J. M. Bower, 1993). The results presented here provide evidence in humans supporting these hypotheses. Young healthy subjects first learned baseline word pairs (A-B) and, after a delay, learned additional overlapping (A-C) and nonoverlapping (D-E) word pairs. As predicted, when compared with subjects who received the active placebo glycopyrrolate (4 microg/kg) and subjects who were not injected, those who received scopolamine (8 microg/kg) showed (a) overall impairment in new word paired-associate learning, but no impairment in cued recall of previously learned associates; and (b) greater impairment in learning overlapping (A-C) compared with nonoverlapping (D-E) paired associates.

    View details for DOI 10.1037/0735-7044.118.1.223

    View details for Web of Science ID 000188981400023

    View details for PubMedID 14979800

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