Stephen Ruoss

Publication Details

  • Plasma vascular endothelial growth factor in acute mountain sickness CHEST Maloney, J., Wang, D., Duncan, T., Voelkel, N., Ruoss, S. 2000; 118 (1): 47-52

    Abstract:

    To investigate the hypothesis that an increase in circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) occurs in mountaineers at high altitude, particularly in association with acute mountain sickness (AMS) and/or low hemoglobin oxygen saturation.: Collection of medical histories, AMS scores, plasma samples, and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) measurements from mountaineers at 1,500 feet (sea level) and at 14,200 feet.Mount McKinley ("Denali"), AK.Sixty-six mountaineers.None.Plasma VEGF at 14,200 feet was not increased in any group. In fact, plasma VEGF was significantly lower in subjects who did not develop AMS (53 +/- 7.9 pg/mL; mean +/- SEM; n = 47) compared to control subjects at sea level (98.4 +/- 14.3 pg/mL; n = 7; p = 0.005). Plasma VEGF at 14, 200 feet for subjects with AMS (62 +/- 12 pg/mL; n = 15) did not differ significantly from subjects at 14,200 feet without AMS, or from control subjects at sea level. Of a small number of subjects with paired specimens at sea level and at base camp (n = 5), subjects who exhibited a decrease in plasma VEGF at 14,200 feet were those who did not develop AMS. Neither SaO(2), prior AMS, AMS symptom scores, or acetazolamide use were correlated with plasma VEGF.Subjects at high altitude who do not develop AMS have lower plasma VEGF levels compared to control subjects at sea level. Plasma VEGF at high altitude is not elevated in association with AMS or hypoxia. Sustained plasma VEGF at altitude may reflect a phenotype more susceptible to AMS.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000088284800014

    View details for PubMedID 10893358

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