Michael Greicius

Publication Details

  • Diverging patterns of amyloid deposition and hypometabolism in clinical variants of probable Alzheimer's disease BRAIN Lehmann, M., Ghosh, P. M., Madison, C., Laforce, R., Corbetta-Rastelli, C., Weiner, M. W., Greicius, M. D., Seeley, W. W., Gorno-Tempini, M. L., Rosen, H. J., Miller, B. L., Jagust, W. J., Rabinovici, G. D. 2013; 136: 844-858

    Abstract:

    The factors driving clinical heterogeneity in Alzheimer's disease are not well understood. This study assessed the relationship between amyloid deposition, glucose metabolism and clinical phenotype in Alzheimer's disease, and investigated how these relate to the involvement of functional networks. The study included 17 patients with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (age at onset <65 years), 12 patients with logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia and 13 patients with posterior cortical atrophy [whole Alzheimer's disease group: age = 61.5 years (standard deviation 6.5 years), 55% male]. Thirty healthy control subjects [age = 70.8 (3.3) years, 47% male] were also included. Subjects underwent positron emission tomography with (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose. All patients met National Institute on Ageing-Alzheimer's Association criteria for probable Alzheimer's disease and showed evidence of amyloid deposition on (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography. We hypothesized that hypometabolism patterns would differ across variants, reflecting involvement of specific functional networks, whereas amyloid patterns would be diffuse and similar across variants. We tested these hypotheses using three complimentary approaches: (i) mass-univariate voxel-wise group comparison of (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose and (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B; (ii) generation of covariance maps across all subjects with Alzheimer's disease from seed regions of interest specifically atrophied in each variant, and comparison of these maps to functional network templates; and (iii) extraction of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B and (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose values from functional network templates. Alzheimer's disease clinical groups showed syndrome-specific (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose patterns, with greater parieto-occipital involvement in posterior cortical atrophy, and asymmetric involvement of left temporoparietal regions in logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia. In contrast, all Alzheimer's disease variants showed diffuse patterns of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B binding, with posterior cortical atrophy additionally showing elevated uptake in occipital cortex compared with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. The seed region of interest covariance analysis revealed distinct (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose correlation patterns that greatly overlapped with the right executive-control network for the early-onset Alzheimer's disease region of interest, the left language network for the logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia region of interest, and the higher visual network for the posterior cortical atrophy region of interest. In contrast, (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B covariance maps for each region of interest were diffuse. Finally, (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose was similarly reduced in all Alzheimer's disease variants in the dorsal and left ventral default mode network, whereas significant differences were found in the right ventral default mode, right executive-control (both lower in early-onset Alzheimer's disease and posterior cortical atrophy than logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia) and higher-order visual network (lower in posterior cortical atrophy than in early-onset Alzheimer's disease and logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia), with a trend towards lower (18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose also found in the left language network in logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia. There were no differences in (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B binding between syndromes in any of the networks. Our data suggest that Alzheimer's disease syndromes are associated with degeneration of specific functional networks, and that fibrillar amyloid-? deposition explains at most a small amount of the clinico-anatomic heterogeneity in Alzheimer's disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/brain/aws327

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315624700016

    View details for PubMedID 23358601

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