Eila C. Skinner

Publication Details

  • Radical cystectomy for elderly patients with bladder carcinoma - An updated experience with 404 patients CANCER Figueroa, A. J., Stein, J. P., Dickinson, M., Skinner, E. C., Thangathurai, D., Mikhail, M. S., Boyd, S. D., Lieskovsky, G., Skinner, D. G. 1998; 83 (1): 141-147

    Abstract:

    The authors evaluated the experiences at their institution with radical cystectomy and urinary diversion performed on elderly bladder carcinoma patients to determine whether age had an impact on the clinical or functional results for this group of patients.Between August 1971 and December 1996, 404 patients age 70 years or older (median age, 74 years) underwent radical cystectomy and urinary diversion for invasive bladder carcinoma: 352 (87%) were ages 70-79 years and 52 (13%) were age 80 years or older. Data analyzed included the following: perioperative mortality; early (within 90 days after surgery) and late (more than 90 days after surgery) postoperative complications, related and unrelated to the urinary diversion; length of hospital stay; pathologic staging; and clinical outcome. These data were then compared with those for 762 patients younger than 70 years (median age, 61 years) who underwent the same procedure during the same time period.The overall mortality rate for patients age 70 years or older was 2.8% (3.2% for those ages 70-79 years, 0% for those age 80 years or older), compared with 2% for patients younger than 70 years. The early complication rate for patients age 70 years or older was 32%, compared with 25% for patients younger than 70 years. Patients age 80 years or older had a similar early complication rate of 29%. Late postoperative complications occurred in 12.4% of patients age 70 years or older, compared with 22.8% of patients younger than 70 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to pathologic stage or length of hospital stay. The 3-year and 5-year overall survival rates for patients age 70 years or older were 60% and 53%, respectively, compared with 68% and 63%, respectively, for patients younger than 70 years (P=0.001). There was no statistical difference between the groups when rates of disease recurrence were compared (P=0.3627). The 5-year recurrence rate for patients age 70 years or older was 35%, compared with a 5-year recurrence rate of 31% for patients younger than 70 years.These data suggest that an aggressive, curative, radical surgical approach and urinary diversion may be a viable treatment strategy for properly selected elderly patients who are in generally good health and require definitive therapy for invasive bladder carcinoma.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000074360600019

    View details for PubMedID 9655304

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