Matt van de Rijn

Publication Details

  • Hodgkin's disease and lymphoproliferations resembling Hodgkin's disease in patients receiving long-term low-dose methotrexate therapy AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SURGICAL PATHOLOGY Kamel, O. W., Weiss, L. M., VANDERIJN, M., Colby, T. V., Kingma, D. W., Jaffe, E. S. 1996; 20 (10): 1279-1287

    Abstract:

    Recently, it has been shown that patients with rheumatologic diseases who are treated with methotrexate can develop immunosuppression-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. Although a variety of lymphoproliferations have been described in the setting of methotrexate therapy, only rare cases of Hodgkin's disease (HD) have been reported. In this study, we provide a more complete characterization of the spectrum of lymphoproliferations that resemble HD or show features diagnostic of HD that occur in patients receiving long-term low-dose methotrexate therapy. Eight patients were receiving methotrexate for various disorders. Four cases were considered to represent lymphoproliferations resembling HD; the other four cases were diagnosed as HD because they showed diagnostic morphologic and immunophenotypic features. All three patients with lymphoproliferations resembling HD on whom follow-up was available experienced tumor regression with methotrexate withdrawal or with methotrexate withdrawal and steroids; none of these three patients required further therapy. All three patients with HD on whom follow-up was available are alive and free of disease following chemotherapy or radiation therapy. In two of these patients, the tumor persisted or progressed despite discontinuation of methotrexate with observation; the third patient received chemotherapy at the same time methotrexate was stopped. Our findings indicate that a spectrum of lymphoproliferations resembling HD or diagnostic of HD can occur in patients receiving long-term low-dose methotrexate therapy. Recognition of these lymphoproliferative disorders is clinically important because a subset of these neoplasms will completely resolve with discontinuation of methotrexate, thereby obviating the need for chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1996VJ66800015

    View details for PubMedID 8827036

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