Jin S. Hahn, MD

Publication Details

  • BRAIN-STEM MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS IN AN 11-YEAR-OLD CHILD PRESENTING AS ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS JOURNAL OF CHILD NEUROLOGY Mostafapour, S. P., ENZMANN, D., North, W., Hahn, J. S. 1995; 10 (6): 476-480

    Abstract:

    Multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis are demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system that can present initially as an acute focal demyelinating syndrome. We report an 11-year-old girl who initially presented with intractable vomiting and hypertension and later developed a subacute onset of focal neurologic (brainstem) signs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large solitary demyelinating lesion of the brain stem consistent with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Because of the morbidity associated with biopsy and its questionable value in the course of management of this patient, she was treated empirically with aggressive supportive measures and high-dose corticosteriod therapy. She had near full recovery, with only minimal neurologic sequelae. Six months later, she presented with similar focal neurologic signs, and a new lesion was found on MRI. Because of the separation of her two episodes in time and central nervous system location, a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was made. Herein, we used this patient to illustrate the difficulty in distinguishing acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from multiple sclerosis in patients who present initially with an acute focal demyelinating syndrome.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1995TD66300011

    View details for PubMedID 8576560

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