Daniel A. Arber, M.D.

Publication Details

  • EXTRAMEDULLARY MYELOID CELL TUMORS - AN IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL AND MORPHOLOGIC STUDY OF 28 CASES AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SURGICAL PATHOLOGY Traweek, S. T., Arber, D. A., Rappaport, H., Brynes, R. K. 1993; 17 (10): 1011-1019

    Abstract:

    In an attempt to correlate the morphologic and immunophenotypic findings in extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMT), we studied 28 cases with a large panel of antibodies using paraffin section immunohistochemistry. A previous or concurrent diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia or chronic myelogenous leukemia was made in 25 cases. Six EMT were morphologically classified as well differentiated (WD-EMT), 17 as poorly differentiated (PD-EMT), and five as blastic EMT. The WD-EMT were easily recognized morphologically and displayed a relatively mature myeloid phenotype, with elastase, CD15, and CD68 positivity in all cases. On the other hand, the five blastic-EMT displayed no morphologic evidence of myeloid derivation, were completely negative for CD15, and were weakly positive for elastase in only one case. The PD-EMT, with a morphologic appearance that resembles large cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, variably expressed CD15 and elastase. CD68 and lysozyme were present in the majority of PD-EMT, with some variability, but were negative in most blastic-EMT. CD45 (LCA) was detected in 75% of all EMT and CD34 was positive in 36%; neither antigen was significantly associated with a specific morphology. CD30 reactivity was not evident in any case, but slight positive staining was seen with CD20 (L26) in one WD-EMT. CD43 (Leu 22) was the only antibody that was positive in 100% of cases; staining was always intense and widespread. Antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) was positive in all cases but two, both with a blastic morphology. We conclude that (a) an immunohistochemical panel including CD20, CD43, CD68, and MPO can successfully identify the vast majority (96%) of EMT in paraffin sections, and (b) there is an association between morphology and phenotype in these lesions.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993LZ18200006

    View details for PubMedID 8372941

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: