Philip A. Pizzo, M.D.

Publication Details

  • DEFECTIVE ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF MONOCYTE-DERIVED MACROPHAGES FROM HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS-INFECTED CHILDREN AGAINST ASPERGILLUS-FUMIGATUS JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES Roilides, E., Holmes, A., Blake, C., Pizzo, P. A., Walsh, T. J. 1993; 168 (6): 1562-1565

    Abstract:

    Invasive aspergillosis recently has been encountered in adults and children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection even without known risk factors, such as neutropenia or corticosteroid therapy. Macrophages play a significant role in the host defenses against Aspergillus organisms by ingesting conidia and preventing their germination to hyphae. The antifungal activity of peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) from 19 HIV-infected children was compared with that of 16 normal controls. The phagocytic activity of patients' MDM, measured as percentage of phagocytosis, was significantly decreased compared with normal donors (P = .014). In addition, the inhibitory activity of MDM on germination of intracellular A. fumigatus conidia was significantly impaired in patients compared with normal controls (P = .016). There was no significant difference in the defects between patients with lower or higher CD4 lymphocyte counts. Impairment of antifungal activity of macrophages may contribute to the susceptibility of HIV-infected patients to aspergillosis.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993MJ70900038

    View details for PubMedID 8245547

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