Philip A. Pizzo, M.D.

Publication Details

  • QUINOLINIC ACID IN THE CEREBROSPINAL-FLUID OF CHILDREN WITH SYMPTOMATIC HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS TYPE-1 DISEASE - RELATIONSHIPS TO CLINICAL STATUS AND THERAPEUTIC RESPONSE JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES Brouwers, P., Heyes, M. P., Moss, H. A., Wolters, P. L., POPLACK, D. G., Markey, S. P., Pizzo, P. A. 1993; 168 (6): 1380-1386

    Abstract:

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a neurotoxin implicated in the neurologic deficits associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Forty children with symptomatic HIV-1 disease had elevated (P < .001) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) QUIN levels (55.8 +/- 8.9 nM) compared with controls (14.9 +/- 3.0 nM). Age-adjusted CSF QUIN concentrations in HIV-1-infected children were predicted by the general index of mental abilities (GIMA, from an age-appropriate intelligence test; r = -0.45, P < .01). Zidovudine therapy reduced CSF QUIN from 64.1 +/- 16.3 to 19.7 +/- 5.2 nM (P < .01; N = 16) and increased GIMA from 76.8 +/- 5.2 to 87.2 +/- 6.3 (P < .001). Encephalopathic HIV-1-infected patients had higher CSF QUIN levels than patients without encephalopathy (79.6 +/- 16.1 vs. 32.7 +/- 6.7 nM, P < .01). CSF QUIN concentrations were also higher (P < .001) in patients who died < or = 3 years after their baseline assessment, compared with those who were still alive. These results warrant further investigation of CSF QUIN in HIV-infected children as a mediator of neurologic dysfunction and a supplemental marker of neurologic disease, particularly when combined with measures of neurocognitive functioning.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1993MJ70900007

    View details for PubMedID 8245522

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