Michael S. B. Edwards M.D.

Publication Details

  • INTRACRANIAL MENINGIOMAS OF THE FIRST 2 DECADES OF LIFE JOURNAL OF NEUROSURGERY Germano, I. M., Edwards, M. S., Davis, R. L., Schiffer, D. 1994; 80 (3): 447-453

    Abstract:

    Meningiomas arising in the first two decades of life are uncommon and their characteristics are controversial. Some authors believe meningiomas in younger patients occur in different locations, have more malignant histological features, and have a worse prognosis than those in adults. To address this controversy, the authors retrospectively reviewed 23 cases of meningiomas in patients under 21 years of age at diagnosis who were operated on at the University of Turin (1948 to 1990) or at the University of California, San Francisco (1970 to 1989). These tumors represented 2.9% of all tumors in this age group and 1.8% of all meningiomas during the study period at the two institutions. There were 14 males and nine females. The mean age at surgery was 13.3 +/- 5.6 years; nine cases occurred in the first decade and 14 in the second. The most common neurological symptoms were a focal neurological deficit (33%) and seizures (25%). Seventy percent of the tumors were supratentorial. A gross total resection was performed in 60% of the cases. Histologically, the majority (74%) of the tumors were meningothelial or mixed. An increased number of mitoses was observed in 33% of the tumors, focal necrosis in 29%, and invasion of adjacent brain in 14%; however, none of the tumors was classified as a Grade III (anaplastic) meningioma. All patients are alive without evidence of recurrent disease 3 to 22 years (mean +/- standard deviation: 10 +/- 7.3 years) after surgery. This study confirms the rarity of meningiomas of the first two decades of life and the absence of the female predominance associated with meningiomas in adults. The location and histological features of these tumors are similar to those in adults; they have a low recurrence rate, and the outcome and survival rate are excellent.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994MY48300005

    View details for PubMedID 8113857

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