Anson Lowe

Publication Details

  • APICAL PLASMA-MEMBRANE PROTEINS ARE NOT OBLIGATORILY STORED IN SECRETORY GRANULES IN EXOCRINE CELLS JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE Colomer, V., Rindler, M. J., Lowe, A. W. 1994; 107: 2271-2277

    Abstract:

    Exocrine cells are epithelial cells in which secretory granules undergo fusion with the apical plasma membrane upon secretagogue stimulation. Several apical plasma membrane proteins have been found in secretory granules in cells from pancreas and salivary glands raising the possibility that incorporation into secretory granules followed by exocytosis of the granules accounts for their insertion into the apical plasma membrane. To test this hypothesis, we have expressed the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) in pancreatic AR42J cells, which make zymogen-like granules upon incubation with dexamethasone. The influenza virus HA is known to be specifically targeted to the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells that lack a regulated pathway and is also known to be excluded from secretory granules in virally-infected pituitary AtT20 cells. Localization of the protein by immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that it accumulated at the plasma membrane of the transfected AR42J cells. HA was not observed in the amylase-rich secretory granules. By immunolabeling of ultrathin cryosections of the transfected cells, HA was also found exclusively on the cell surface, with label over secretory granules not exceeding that seen in control, untransfected cells. In addition, in cell fractionation experiments performed on radiolabeled AR42J cell transformants, HA was not detectable in the secretory granule fractions. These results indicate that HA is not efficiently stored in mature secretory granules and is likely to reach the cell surface via constitutive transport pathways.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1994PD47500022

    View details for PubMedID 7983185

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