Samuel Strober

Publication Details

  • Unique patterns of surface receptors, cytokine secretion, and immune functions distinguish T cells in the bone marrow from those in the periphery: impact on allogeneic bone marrow transplantation BLOOD Zeng, D. F., Hoffmann, P., Lan, F. S., Huie, P., Higgins, J., Strober, S. 2002; 99 (4): 1449-1457

    Abstract:

    The "conventional" NK1.1(-) T cells from mouse blood and marrow were compared with regard to surface receptors, cytokine secretion, and function. Most blood NK1.1(-) CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells expressed the naive CD44(int/lo)CD62L(hi)CD45RB(hi) T-cell phenotype typical of those in the peripheral lymphoid tissues. In contrast, most marrow NK1.1(-) CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells expressed an unusual CD44(hi)CD62L(hi)CD45RB(hi) phenotype. The blood NK1.1(-) CD4(+) T cells had a naive T-helper cytokine profile and a potent capacity to induce lethal graft versus host (GVH) disease in a C57BL/6 donor to a BALB/c host bone marrow transplantation model. In contrast, the marrow NK1.1(-) CD4(+) T cells had a Th0 cytokine profile and failed to induce lethal GVH disease, even at 20-fold higher numbers than those from the blood. NK1.1(-) CD8(+) T cells from the blood but not the marrow induced lethal GVH disease. Nevertheless, the marrow NK1.1(-) CD8(+) T cells induced potent antitumor activity that was augmented by marrow NK1.1(-) CD4(+) T cells and facilitated hematopoietic progenitor engraftment. The inability of marrow CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to induce GVH disease was associated with their inability to expand in the blood and gut of allogeneic recipients. Because neither the purified marrow CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells induced GVH disease, their unique features are desirable for inclusion in allogeneic bone marrow or hematopoietic progenitor transplants.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000173787600050

    View details for PubMedID 11830499

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